Cocobolo Spear Point Camp Knife

Cocobolo Spear Point Camp Knife
Cocobolo Spear Point Camp Knife
Cocobolo Spear Point Camp Knife
Cocobolo Spear Point Camp Knife
Cocobolo Spear Point Camp Knife
Cocobolo Spear Point Camp Knife
Cocobolo Spear Point Camp Knife
Cocobolo Spear Point Camp Knife

Cocobolo Spear Point Camp Knife
This is an 8-inch spear point camp knife made from 440 stainless steel. The blade is single-edged and sharp as razor (i know, i just cut myself on it). Although you can certainly use this knife outdoors, i imagine it as a presentation knife, displayed in someone’s den or man cave. The finger guard and butt cap are also made from stainless and are securely attached to the blade itself with hand-pounded stainless steel rivets. Each rivet takes a couple hundred blows from a ball-peen hammer. The handle is made from book-matched cocobolo. This hardwood is from central america and is often used in up-market pistol grips. I cut the handle blanks from a piece i’ve had in my shop for more than a decade. I customized the knife with hand-ground filework along both edges of the tang. I used a vine pattern i like. I do this work on the hardened steel with diamond bits and abrasive miniature cutoff wheels on my dremel tool. I then power buffed everything to a mirror finish on my buffing wheels. I made the custom sheath for the knife from a piece of heavy vegetable-tanned tooling leather. I tooled the wet leather with a simple pattern, then sewed it with waxed nylon saddle thread in a double harness stitch. Finally, i hand dyed the sheath a rich mahogany color and applied a satin finishing treatment. The knife will fit in the leather sheath either way – applicable for both right and left hand belt carry. I try to make things the “old fashioned” way, and there’s nothing really old-fashioned about gripper snaps. So, i retain the knife in the sheath with a leather thong secured by a polished water buffalo horn bead. I used a matching bead on the paracord lanyard i made for the handle. I tied the box knot lanyard myself. With some memory prompting online help. I’m an old man and it’s been a long time since i tied a lanyard. I built a little l-shaped cherry stand to show off the knife. You can set the knife on the stand with or without, the sheath. And you can display the knife either flat or with the tang edge facing out to show the filework. I’ve signed and dated the bottom of the stand. I added a fitment to the back of the stand – a place to attach the sheath when displaying the knife without the sheath. (see the last photo). The blade bears my initial. I electro-etched this into the blade. That’s a fancy-sounding process involving a battery charger, finger-nail polish, salt water, a couple of alligator clip leads, and a q-tip. The polished blade picks up finger prints easily. I’ve found that glass cleaner works well to keep the blade shining. I use sprayway glass cleaner. Oh, by the way – you don’t get my brass-frame reproduction 1858 remington black powder. 44 caliber sheriff’s revolver. That’s just in the photo for scale and a little drama. One caution about displaying your knife – especially without the sheath:: be aware that the knife is a dangerous object and can be knocked off the stand and may fall and cause some damage. If you display your knife on an open shelf, or a mantle, please display it with the sheath on. You can display the bare blade on the stand behind glass. My knives are sharp and must be handled with care. All knives should be kept out of the reach of children and others who may be prone to injury or accidents. This item is made of cocobolo and stainless steel.
Cocobolo Spear Point Camp Knife